Before iWatch: the timely history of the smartwatch

31st Aug 2013 | 12:01

Before iWatch: the timely history of the smartwatch

The long and winding road to the iWatch and Galaxy Gear

History of the smartwatch: past times

Smart watches have been the next big thing since 1982. But this year is going to be different: when Samsung's Galaxy Gear drops on the 4th of September it's going to start a whole new wave of wearable tech - and if it doesn't then the Apple iWatch definitely will.

And if that doesn't? Well, we've got smart watches to look forward to from pretty much everyone.

So what's different this time, and why haven't smart watches taken off before now? Let's look at some of the major milestones - and mistakes.

1982: Pulsar NL C01

Pulsar is a Seiko brand, and while the NL C01 was rather primitive by today's standards - it stored just 24 digits of information - it was quickly followed by more models such as 1984's UC-2000 and 1985's UC-3000. Both of these watches were ambitious: you could buy them with a dock that boasted a thermal printer and a memory cartridge slot.

UC-2000

Ambitious is a relative term, of course: mid-eighties smart watches were still rather gimmicky. What they didn't have was connectivity. Bluetooth was a decade away and cellular hardware was far too big and far too expensive: the enormous Motorola DynaTAC 8000X would set you back a whopping $3,995.

1984: Seiko RC-1000

Seiko's RC-1000 synchronised via a cable, and it was compatible with the various PCs of the time including Apple and Commodore C64 hardware.

RC-1000

Another model, the RC-4000 (dubbed the PC Datagraph) was released in 1985 and that shrugged off the plastic look of the RC-1000, favouring a stainless steal chassis.

RC-4000

It was known for its unusual three-line dot-matrix type and the fact that it housed 2KB of RAM.

RC-1000

1990: Seiko Receptor

The next big shift in smart watches happened at the turn of the decade, and it went beep - literally in the case of Swatch, whose The Beep watch followed in the footsteps of Seiko's 1990 Receptor, a watch that doubled as a pager.

Seiko Receptor

For the first time, smart watches were wirelessly connected to the wider world. All they needed now was all the other stuff. That stuff started to appear in late 90s, largely thanks to - you guessed it - Seiko.

1998: Seiko Ruputer

The 1998 Ruputer (later launched as the OnHand PC in the US) was more of a computer than a watch, boasting a 16-bit processor and 128KB of RAM. The screen wasn't up to much - it was a 102x64 mono LCD - and it wasn't a touchscreen, but you could write apps for the Ruputer in C.

Seiko Reputor

Samsung was thinking about smart watches too: its SPH-WP10 was the first watch phone, although while the device has spawned several imitators it was never an enormous success.

Linux Watchpad

IBM and Citizen tried a Linux smart watch, the WatchPad, but it was short lived. Fossil lasted longer, having found a way to cram the Palm OS into a much smaller screen (Palm OS was designed for PDAs, but Fossil's watches used smaller cellphone screens): it launched multiple models from 2002 to 2005.

History of the smartwatch: time trialled

2004: Microsoft SPOT

You can usually count on Microsoft to enter a potentially massive market far too early, so you won't be surprised to discover that it was making smart watches nearly a decade ago. Microsoft's platform was called Smart Personal Object Technology, or SPOT for short, and it used FM broadcasts to update subscribers' data in major US cities.

Microsoft Spot

A subscription was $59 per year. SPOT watches were released from 2004 until 2008, and Microsoft shut down the SPOT-updating MSN Direct service in 2012.

2009: Samsung S9110 Watch Phone

Microsoft had the right idea and the wrong answer. The future of the smart watch was wireless, but the wireless wasn't FM: it was Bluetooth. The relentless march of smartphone tech meant that all the pieces of the puzzle were starting to come together: better batteries, touch screens and low-power, short-range connections to internet-connected devices such as smartphones.

Samsung Smartwatch

By the beginning of this decade, firm after firm had seen the potential. Samsung had its S9110 Watch Phone (2009). Sony Ericsson launched its LiveView (2010) to pull data from Android phones, and Allerta's InPulse (also 2010) did the same for BlackBerries.

Motorola Actv

WIMM Labs' WIMM One (2011) shoved a modified version of Android into a watch-sized device, Motorola's Motoactv (also 2011) combined fitness information and music playback and Apple found that many of its square iPod Nanos (2011 again) ended up on people's wrists.

2012: Pebbles and fitness kit

By the end of 2012 we were up to our wrists in wearables: Nike+ Fuelbands and Jawbone Ups, the epaper-screened Pebble and the cute Cuckoo, the Sony Smartwatch and all kinds of GPS trackers and exercise monitors.

Pebble

But while many of them are very good indeed, their relatively small sales suggest that nobody has quite nailed the smart watch yet. Could Samsung be about to change that?

Cuckoo

2013: Samsung Galaxy Gear

Samsung has confirmed that its latest smartwatch will be called the Samsung Galaxy Gear and the rumour is that it can make phone calls, play video games and send emails. Samsung also promises tight integration with Android phones via a watch manager app.

Galaxy Gear

It does look as if the watch won't connect to Google Play, however, rather Samsung's own app store. Essentially, the Galaxy Gear is set to be the one device that links up the whole Galaxy family.

201?: Apple iWatch

The iWatch is the most written-about might-not-exist product of the age, helping to fuel the smart watch gold rush despite nobody having the faintest idea whether it's real or not - and if it is, what it'll do or why we should care.

iWatch

Might we see the iWatch at Apple's September iPhone event? It's certainly one to, ahem, watch.

iWatch Galaxy Gear wearable tech watches smartwatch auhottest
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