Best standard zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

10th Apr 2012 | 10:00

Best standard zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

The best zoom lens upgrade options

Standard zoom lenses explained

A standard zoom is the lens most of us use for the majority of our shooting. It can deliver everything from wide-angle to short telephoto focal lengths, providing great versatility. Plus, the overall image quality isn't compromised to the extent it usually is with a superzoom lens.

Compared with an 18-200mm lens, the more modest zoom range of a standard lens tends to result in greater sharpness at all available focal lengths. You're also likely to get less distortion, reduced chromatic aberration (colour fringing) and less vignetting (darkened corners). This is especially true when you're combining the shortest focal length with the largest available aperture.

It's no surprise, then, that Nikon sells most of its DSLRs with the option of a 'kit' standard zoom lenses. The most popular are the 18-55mm VR and 18-105mm VR. They're both good, giving acceptable sharpness, contrast and all-round image quality. Even so, it's easy to feel that they're built on a budget.

The mounting plates are plastic rather than metal, and lack the rubber weather seals featured on many of Nikon's more upmarket lenses. Also, the lenses are lightweight and can feel flimsy.

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

The Vibration Reduction (VR) system on the Nikon 18-55mm and 18-105mm lenses lacks the brand's popular 'Active' mode, and its AF-S autofocus is based on fairly slow motor-driven ultrasonic motors, not the faster and quieter ring-type system.

Ring-type ultrasonic autofocus is featured in all of the Nikon lenses here, as well as the Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8. It gives you full-time manual focus override in Single AF mode. Another minus point of the 18-55mm VR kit lens is that its front element rotates during focusing, which makes it tricky to use rotation-specific filters such as circular polarisers.

So what are the main upgrade choices? The first thing to consider is whether you're using an FX (full-frame) body such as the Nikon D700 or a DX body that has a smaller APS-C format (Advanced Photo System - Classic) sensor.

For FX bodies, the main contenders are the Nikon 24-70mm, Sigma 24-70mm and Tamron 28-75mm. However, there's something to be said for using these lenses on DX bodies as well.

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Due to the crop factor, you'll only be using the central part of the lens' image circle, where picture quality is at its best. That means you can expect less vignetting and the possibility of greater sharpness in the extreme corners of a photo.

The downside of using an FX lens on a DX camera is that you'll sacrifice wide-angle potential. For example, a 24-70mm model gives an effective zoom range of 36-105mm on cameras such as the Nikon D3100, D5100 and D7000.

The short end of the zoom range is effectively still very close to the classic wide-angle focal length of 35mm, but the Tamron 28-75mm's maximum wide-angle equivalent of 42mm really puts it out of the running.

Either way, a standard zoom that's designed exclusively for DX cameras and zooms out to 16 or 17mm has an effective wide-angle potential of 24 or 25.5mm respectively. This gives a much wider angle of view that most photographers will find far more appealing.

Overall construction quality in the lenses on test is also a step up from Nikon's 18-55mm VR and 18-105mm kit lenses. All models in the group are more robust and each of the three Nikon lenses features weather seals.

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Even so, some of the lenses still feel a bit plasticky, whereas the Sigma 24-70mm feels particularly sturdy and the Nikon 17-55mm and 24-70mm models have fully professional build quality. They're big, weighty beasts, with metal bodies, and are built to take the knocks of daily duty on tough assignments.

The drawback is that, when you're walking around, the relatively large size and weight can feel cumbersome. At nearly 1kg and 133mm in length, the Nikon 24-70mm in particular feels a bit unbalanced on a lightweight body such as a D3100 or D5100.

Need for speed

Another major consideration is the 'speed' of the lens, or its maximum aperture. As with any other type of zoom lens, standard zooms often have maximum apertures that shrink a little as you extend the focal length.

For example, the Nikon 16-85mm has a maximum available aperture of f/3.5 at 16mm but only f/5.6 at 85mm. The alternative is a 'constant-aperture' lens, where the maximum available aperture is fixed throughout the zoom range. In this class, it's typically f/2.8, two stops faster than f/5.6.

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

A big advantage of a larger maximum aperture is that you can get a smaller depth of field. That's good for isolating the main area of interest in a shot by blurring the background, and is particularly useful in portraiture.

Other bonuses include the potential of faster, more accurate autofocus in dull light, and a brighter viewfinder image. However, constant-aperture zoom lenses typically have less zoom range and leave you wanting at the telephoto end.

If you'd rather have the extra zoom range, it's well worth considering an f/3.5-5.6 standard zoom, and buying a 50mm f/1.8 prime lens for portraiture as well. At about £90 ($120), the Nikon 50mm f/1.8D is a cracking lens and has a faster aperture than any of the other zooms on test.

Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 SP AF XR Di II VC

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 SP AF XR Di II VC - £345/$560

Despite having the same fast, constant aperture as the Nikon 17-55mm f/2.8 the Tamron is smaller, lighter and cheaper. It also has a four-stop optical stabiliser, which is lacking on the Nikon. On the surface it looks a steal, but the devil is in the detail.

Build quality feels less rugged than with the Nikon lens, and the basic electric motor autofocus is relatively sluggish and noisy. Even the Vibration Correction (VC) is audible.

Lab test results look quite good on the whole, but while sharpness is good at the centre of the frame, it drops away alarmingly towards the corners. This is especially true at f/2.8, at both ends of the zoom range. Even when you're shooting at f/8, any fine detail is largely lost around the edges of images.

It also seems to cause a problem with overexposure, which often happens by about two-thirds of a stop. This results in overly bright images and blown highlights. The effect is most noticeable at the wide-angle end of the zoom range, where you always have to be ready to dial in some negative exposure compensation.

Sharpness test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Sharpness is very respectable at the centre of the frame, but it's poor towards the corners at some apertures.

Lab test at f/8
Sharpness at wide angle: 2383
Sharpness at mid range: 2404
Sharpness at telephoto: 2343

Fringing test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

At maximum zoom

Fringing isn't too bad at wide angles but, unlike most lenses, this lens doesn't improve much at longer focal lengths.

Lab test at f/8
Fringing at wide angle: 0.33
Fringing at mid range: 0.32
Fringing at telephoto: 0.27

Distortion test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

At minimum zoom

Barrel distortion is quite pronounced at 17mm, but there's practically no distortion at the 50mm end.

Lab test at f/8
Distortion at wide angle: -3.66
Distortion at mid range: -0.18
Distortion at telephoto: 0.09

Image quality verdict

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Taken at 28mm

Edge and corner sharpness are quite poor, especially at the f/2.8 focal length, and you often need to stop down to f/5.6 for good results.

Read the full Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 SP AF XR Di II VC review

Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM - £350/$470

This Sigma bridges the gap between fast constant-aperture lenses and those with a more generous zoom. Its maximum available apertures are about a stop larger than with most kit lenses, ranging from f/2.8 at 17mm to f/4 at 70mm.

The zoom range is quite impressive, too, equivalent to 25.5-105mm. The lens also features four-stop Optical Stabilization and only costs marginally more than the Tamron 17-50mm VC.

The HSM (Hyper-Sonic Motor) autofocus isn't a ring-type system, so uses a motor and gear wheels, but it's a lot quieter and a bit faster than the Tamron lenses' more basic electric motors. The focus ring rotates during autofocus, so take care not to foul its action.

You get plenty of sharpness and contrast, though not quite as much as with the similar Nikon 16-85mm VR. Barrel distortion at 17mm switches to pin-cushion at 35mm, which then stays at a similar level up to 70mm. Even so, the amounts of these distortions aren't too severe, especially considering that the overall zoom range is bigger than average.

Sharpness test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Corner-to-corner sharpness is great for a lens of this price, but the zoom isn't on a par with the best in the group.

Lab test at f/8
Sharpness at wide angle: 2345
Sharpness at mid range: 2143
Sharpness at telephoto: 2134

Fringing test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Fringing is well contained and only really noticeable around high-contrast edges towards the corners of the frame.

Lab test at f/8
Fringing at wide angle: 0.43
Fringing at mid range: 0.21
Fringing at telephoto: 0.12

Distortion test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Barrel and pin-cushion distortion is restrained, especially considering the above-average zoom range of this lens.

Lab test at f/8
Distortion at wide angle: -2.97
Distortion at mid range: 1.26
Distortion at telephoto: 1.28

Image quality verdict

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Overall image quality lags a little behind the more expensive lenses in the group, but the Sigma is still very good value at the price.

Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 SP AF XR Di LD

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 SP AF XR Di LD - £355/$450

With a fairly conventional zoom range of 28-75mm, this Tamron lens lacks wide-angle coverage compared with Nikon and Sigma's 24-70mm lenses. On full-frame DSLRs such as the D700, it's noticeable how much less width there is in the maximum angle of view. On a DX body, any wide-angle potential is completely lost.

Build quality and handling are on a par with Tamron's slightly cheaper 17-50mm lens, being adequate but not impressive. The full-frame lens is much slimmer and has a fairly small 67mm filter thread, despite its large f/2.8 constant aperture.

However, unlike the Tamron 17-50mm VC, this lens lacks optical stabilisation. The basic electric motor that drives autofocus is slow and loud.

Mounting this lens on a DX body flatters its performance. Sharpness is quite good from corner to corner, and vignetting is also very low, even when you're shooting at 28mm at f/2.8. On a full-frame camera, though, edge sharpness is poorer. In both cases, contrast is a little on the low side, especially when light conditions are gloomy.

Sharpness test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

On a full-frame body, sharpness around the borders is a little lacking, but it's not so noticeable on DX cameras.

Lab test at f/8
Sharpness at wide angle: 2262
Sharpness at mid range: 2287
Sharpness at telephoto: 2079

Fringing test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

The worst lens in the group for fringing, most noticeably at the edges of the frame at wide-angle settings.

Lab test at f/8
Fringing at wide angle: 1.42
Fringing at mid range: 1.21
Fringing at telephoto: 0.32

Distortion test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Fairly little distortion at any zoom length. This is the most impressive facet of the Tamron's image quality.

Lab test at f/8
Distortion at wide angle: -1.48
Distortion at mid range: -0.48
Distortion at telephoto: 0.5

Image quality verdict

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

It's not a star performer on DX cameras, and no match for the Nikon and Sigma 24-70mm lenses on a full-frame body.

Nikon 16-85mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S DX ED VR II

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Nikon 16-85mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S DX ED VR II - £420/$650

There are plenty of high-end features packed into this travel-friendly zoom. The ring-type ultrasonic autofocus is fast, practically silent and comes complete with full-time manual override.

The VR II optical stabiliser is similarly top notch, offering a four-stop advantage as well as boasting an 'Active' mode that's ideal for shooting from vibrating platforms or when you've got the shivers.

Build quality isn't a match for the pro Nikon lenses on test but the lens is still pretty tough and beautifully put together, feeling much more of a quality item than Nikon's kit zooms. The only drawback is that the maximum aperture of f/5.6 at the long end of the zoom range is two stops slower than for some of the lenses on test. And f/5.6 at 85mm still gives scope for minimising depth of field.

The 16-85mm acquits itself well in the lab and is a joy to use. The VR system is superb and image quality is impressively sharp, even at the largest apertures, making the f/5.6 at 85mm all the more usable. Contrast is excellent and the lens gives superb results in practically any shooting conditions.

Sharpness test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Lab data isn't spectacular at 85mm, but real-world results are pin-sharp corner to corner.

Lab test at f/8
Sharpness at wide angle: 2359
Sharpness at mid range: 2318
Sharpness at telephoto: 2076

Fringing test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

At 16mm there's only slight colour fringing, which essentially disappears at longer focal lengths.

Lab test at f/8
Fringing at wide angle: 0.71
Fringing at mid range: 0.13
Fringing at telephoto: 0.16

Distortion test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Distortion is only really noticeable at 16mm, but even here it's very uniform and easy to correct when editing.

Lab test at f/8
Distortion at wide angle: -3.43
Distortion at mid range: 1.21
Distortion at telephoto: 1.18

Image quality verdict

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

With great sharpness and contrast, helped by highly effective optical stabilisation, this is a brilliant lens for handheld photography.

Read the full Nikon 16-85mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S DX ED VR II review

Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM - £570/$670

At a glance, there's very little to distinguish this lens and the Sigma 17-70mm, which costs much less. As an 'EX' lens, the 17-50mm has an upmarket, textured coating to denote superior build and optical quality, but both lenses are of a similar size and weight, and the controls and onboard markings are nearly identical.

The main difference is that the 17-50mm is a fast constant-aperture f/2.8 lens with a smaller zoom range. As expected, the filter size is larger, at 77mm instead of 72mm.

Disappointingly, the HSM autofocus system isn't ring-type, so the focus ring rotates during autofocus and impairs handling slightly. There's also no full-time manual override. On the plus side, Sigma's four-stop optical stabiliser works very well.

Optical quality is excellent, even at the maximum aperture of f/2.8, and there's impressively low vignetting. The only caveat is that corner sharpness is a little poor at f/2.8, especially at focal lengths of 28-35mm. However, this isn't a problem in practical terms, as you'd usually use the large aperture to reduce depth of field and blur the background.

Sharpness test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Levels of sharpness are impressive right into the corners, even at the maximum f/2.8 aperture.

Lab test at f/8
Sharpness at wide angle: 2562
Sharpness at mid range: 2354
Sharpness at telephoto: 2469

Fringing test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Fairly consistent throughout the zoom range, colour fringing is well controlled and barely noticeable in most shots.

Lab test at f/8
Fringing at wide angle: 0.56
Fringing at mid range: 0.48
Fringing at telephoto: 0.34

Distortion test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Some barrel distortion at 17mm, and this switches to a small amount of pin-cushion by 28mm.

Lab test at f/8
Distortion at wide angle: -2.71
Distortion at mid range: 0.63
Distortion at telephoto: 0.98

Image quality verdict

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Overall image quality isn't better than with the Nikon 16-85mm, but this Sigma is a good choice if you want the faster, constant aperture.

Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 EX DG IF HSM

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 EX DG IF HSM - £640/$900

This beefy Sigma optic is a little broader than Nikon's 24-70mm full-frame lens, but is slightly lighter and nearly 20mm shorter. Build quality and finish are excellent, with silky smooth zoom and focus rings. The latter gives the additional benefit of full-time override in autofocus mode, thanks to a super-fast and blissfully quiet ring-type ultrasonic system.

The constant f/2.8 aperture is nice to have, but one thing that's lacking is Sigma's OS (Optical Stabilization), which is featured on the smaller 17-50mm f/2.8 lens for DX cameras. Filters will also be expensive, because at 82mm this lens has the widest diameter thread in the group.

Sharpness is good, but drops off a little at the 50mm zoom setting and could be better in the corners at the wide-angle end at f/2.8. There's plenty of contrast and distortions are fairly low.

Vignetting is less pronounced than with the Tamron 28-75mm lens on a full-frame body and negligible on a DX camera. Overall, it's a high-quality lens that only costs about half the price of the competing Nikon.

Sharpness test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Very good overall, but there's a slight dip in sharpness at focal lengths around the 50mm mark.

Lab test at f/8
Sharpness at wide angle: 2298
Sharpness at mid range: 2175
Sharpness at telephoto: 1926

Fringing test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

There's not much fringing throughout the zoom range but the lens can't quite match the mighty Nikon 24-70mm.

Lab test at f/8
Fringing at wide angle: 0.31
Fringing at mid range: 0.23
Fringing at telephoto: 0.24

Distortion test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

A little barrel distortion at wide-angle and mid-zoom lengths, switching to fairly low pin-cushion at the long end.

Lab test at f/8
Distortion at wide angle: -2.17
Distortion at mid range: -0.55
Distortion at telephoto: 0.71

Image quality verdict

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

The Sigma 24-70mm offers excellent image quality on both full-frame and DX-format cameras, making it a great value option.

Nikon 17-55mm f/2.8G AF-S IF-ED

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Nikon 17-55mm f/2.8G AF-S IF-ED - £1065/$1425

A hefty lens with battleship build quality, this 17-55mm is the discerning professional's choice. Indeed, there's nothing amateurish about its price tag. Even so, the cheaper equivalent Sigma and Tamron lenses both feature optical stabilisation, which is lacking in the Nikon lens.

The 17-55mm's ring-type ultrasonic autofocus system is spectacularly fast and unerringly accurate. It's even faster than the similar system fitted to both the Nikon 16-85mm and Sigma 24-70mm lenses on test. There's plenty of travel in the focus ring, too, which aids precise manual focusing in MF mode and when overriding autofocus.

Overall image quality is excellent, but sharpness is no better than with the Nikon 16-85mm lens in the 17-55mm sector of its zoom range. Sure, the cheaper Nikon's sharpness drops off a little at 85mm, but the pro lens doesn't offer this focal length anyway.

Distortion is similar between the two lenses, and fringing is slightly better on the 16-85mm. The only real bonus of this lens is the larger maximum aperture, which is just over a stop faster.

Sharpness test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

A good performer, but sharpness isn't better than it is in the 17-55mm portion of the Nikon 16-85mm lens' range.

Lab test at f/8
Sharpness at wide angle: 2345
Sharpness at mid range: 2421
Sharpness at telephoto: 2494

Fringing test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Chromatic aberration is among the highest on test at 17mm, even though it's reduced by current Nikon DSLRs.

Lab test at f/8
Fringing at wide angle: 1.25
Fringing at mid range: 0.36
Fringing at telephoto: 0.18

Distortion test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

From barrel distortion to pin-cushion, performance is almost identical to Nikon's cheaper 16-85mm lens.

Lab test at f/8
Distortion at wide angle: -3.27
Distortion at mid range: 1.35
Distortion at telephoto: 1.14

Image quality verdict

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

There's no real increase in image quality compared with Nikon's 16-85mm, though the 17-55mm does have a faster maximum aperture.

Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8G AF-S ED

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8G AF-S ED - £1225/$1890

When it comes to size and weight, this lens feels more like a 70-300mm telephoto than a standard zoom. It's still well balanced on a big, heavy body such as a D4 or D700, though. As a grown-up, full-frame version of the Nikon 17-55mm, this lens also features a fast, constant f/2.8 aperture and lightning-quick, ring-type ultrasonic autofocus.

One advantage of the lens over the DX-format 17-55mm is that it features Nikon's Nano Crystal coating, which does a great job of reducing ghosting and flare. On the other hand, similarities include the lack of an optical stabiliser, which makes handheld shooting more of a challenge.

As you'd expect from a flagship standard zoom, contrast and sharpness are excellent throughout the zoom range. There's little colour fringing at either end of the range, but it can be noticeable at mid-zoom settings.

Distortions are well controlled at all focal lengths.The sheer length of the lens makes it impossible to use candidly, but for all-round build and image quality this is as good as it gets for full-frame shooters.

Sharpness test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

It's top of the full-frame class for sharpness, beating Sigma and Tamron competitors, but is expensive.

Lab test at f/8
Sharpness at wide angle: 2468
Sharpness at mid range: 2381
Sharpness at telephoto: 2471

Fringing test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Colour fringing is a non-issue at either end of the zoom range, and only slightly noticeable at mid-range settings.

Lab test at f/8
Fringing at wide angle: 0.15
Fringing at mid range: 0.48
Fringing at telephoto: 0.16

Distortion test

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Distortions are minimal throughout the zoom range, so the lens is especially suitable for architectural shots.

Lab test at f/8
Distortion at wide angle: -1.45
Distortion at mid range: 0.15
Distortion at telephoto: 0.23

Image quality verdict

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

Brilliant image quality in all respects, but it comes at a very high price and the lack of stabilisation can downgrade handheld results.

Verdict: Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs

Best zoom lens upgrade for Nikon DSLRs: 8 tested

A standard zoom is ideal for walkabout photography, and the compact Nikon 16-85mm
f/3.5-5.6G AF-S DX ED VR II weighs less than 500g, so is an ideal travel companion, and our best on test.

Despite its small, lightweight design, build quality feels great and luxuries include fast, deadly accurate ring-type ultrasonic autofocus, as well as a brilliant dual-mode optical stabiliser. It also has the biggest zoom range in the group. Most importantly, image quality is superb.

One thing the lens lacks is a relatively fast, constant maximum aperture of f/2.8. However, the f/2.8 lenses on test have less zoom range, lacking the telephoto reach of their slower rivals. By using the longer focal length of 85mm, you can still get a similarly tight depth of field at f/5.6.

And if you need faster shutter speeds, there's a lot to be said for increasing the ISO setting in current Nikon cameras (which deliver excellent image quality at high sensitivities) rather than having to use a larger f/2.8 aperture.

The Nikon 16-85mm is fairly affordable, but if you want a DX-format lens on a tighter budget, the Sigma 17-70mm is great. We're not so impressed with the even cheaper Tamron 17-50mm. It lacks sharpness away from the frame centre and often seems to cause metering errors.

The best-value f/2.8 for DX cameras is the Sigma 17-50mm, with its four-stop stabiliser.

For FX cameras, there aren't any optically stabilised standard zooms, but the Sigma 24-70mm is the best buy. It costs less than half the price of the Nikon 24-70mm. The DX-format Nikon 17-55mm f/2.8 also lacks stabilisation. Unless you need bombproof build, the Nikon f/2.8 lenses are fairly poor value for money.

zoom lenses DSLRs Nikon cameras Buying Guides camerascarousel-en-gb
Share this Article
Google+

Most Popular

Edition: UK
TopView classic version